Capturing Rectangles

There are lots of approaches to mobile OS development these days. Some folks are closed, some are open, some are really stable, others risk stability for customizability, etc. There’s one OS that I’ve always admired for its cleanliness, integration, and overall user experience, and that’s WebOS. The underdog of the “Mobile OS Wars”, WebOS did a lot of really neat things that its competitors simply didn’t want to do or didn’t want to risk because they had too much on the table. Palm, which developed WebOS, had little to lose, and they bet most of it on WebOS. Some could argue that they lost that fight, but I think HP’s acquisition of WebOS recently was a phenomenal idea and a great long-term strategy. I get what happened there, and HP makes a good argument as to why they did it.

HP currently sells a lot of computer, possibly more than any other company, but they’ve long lacked any real brand identity. They’ve been plagued by the same problem just about every other computer company has had: reliance on Microsoft. When netbooks took the stage just prior to the tablet revolution, a lot of companies- HP included- tried to get on board with customer Linux builds that were easy to put together and load because they included no licensing fees. The problem was that the OS conventions didn’t quit carry over, and the software that people were expecting to run, well…it didn’t. For the computer-savvy individual, this didn’t matter much. For the older folks looking to get their first computer because it was “cute”, netbooks were a disaster.

So, HP’s acquisition of Palm and all of its resources- WebOS included- was smart. This is going to allow HP to finally create an OS that can be associated synonymously with the HP brand. I imagine that WebOS will eventually have its name changed as well, but it’s sticking for now.

What I also applaud is HP’s apparent commitment to bring WebOS to everything including possibly refrigerators. This is where things start to get really interesting because these devices can (theoretically) be aware of each other and include the ability to work right out of the box (in much the same way Apple is building iOS into other things), or open the door to the introduction of new features down the road which may not have been available at release.

The other interesting aspect to HP’s decision is to recognize that their new OS isn’t just about layering a “touch-friendly” shell over an ugly set of insides, it’s about designing a unique experience from the ground up using an OS that can be scaled to fit everything from phones to high-powered desktop boxes. Eventually, if the developer community is rich enough, people will realize that these custom OS builds are actually the way people want to work, not some of this crud.


Cutting to the Bone


The announcement of Windows 8 and its subsequent demos were interesting for many reasons, not the least of which was its inevitable comparison to Lion, iOS, and Android. To be fair, Android should generally be left out of this comparison since it doesn’t have a true desktop operating system (yet), but periodic comparisons have to be made.

Windows 8’s user interface, at least the touch portion, looks good. I like the clean, muted-color aesthetic, and the transitions between apps looks natural and pleasing (similar to the Star Trek LCARS aesthetic, but a little bit sharper). The way that Microsoft is pushing this thing, however, is silly to me. Recently, I wrote about Apple playing “catch-up” with this release, but something I failed to address was the simplicity of the whole experience, and this is ultimately the most important aspect of the entire OS.

I can wax poetic about the history of the personal computer and its role in our lives, the changes that personal computing has brought to our lives and how we experience the world around us, but it’s unnecessary. We all know that the face of personal computing is changing rapidly and being redefined constantly. Instead, let’s ask a fundamental question:

Why are computers becoming “simpler”?

I know lots of people who lament the “over-simplification” of today’s computers. Computers should require lots of specialized knowledge and time to learn, in the opinion of many folks. They don’t understand that all the layers of schlock the operating system puts in between a user and the task that they wish to accomplish are unnecessary and silly. In order to build a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel, for instance, I need to understand Microsoft Excel conventions and jargon on top of Microsoft Windows conventions and jargon. This is difficult, and it gets in the way of actually accomplishing things. The learning of the tool takes up more time and energy than using it. This is bad technology, but has come to be accepted.

Companies that design software continue to simplify it so that it gets out of the way of the user’s intentions and goals, so that it helps them accomplish what they need to accomplish. This is good technology, and has difficulty gaining traction because the software almost looks like a toy compared to the byzantine and grotesque software hydras that have become commonplace in the world.

I remember using my Palm Treo 700w, the Windows Mobile version of the popular Palm smartphone. It had a custom build of the Windows Mobile software that was tuned for the Palm “experience” which meant that it worked better than standard windows. I thought it was really great, but what really blew me away was a software shell (a layer over the standard Windows Mobile OS that looked way better than the standard home screen) by SPB called “SPB Mobile Shell”. This was right around the time the iPhone was introduced, incidentally. I tried using this OS shell for a while because it was “touch-friendly” (where have we heard that before?), but ultimately gave up because the phone was still using a really ugly, really unusable OS designed for styli under all the gloss and shine.

This is what Windows 8 is, and it’s flawed. The key is to change what the OS is at its heart, change the way that interacts with the user, change the way that OS feels. IF the user gets the opportunity to “peek under the hood” of the OS, he or she will see the ugliest, most confusing parts of the system laid bare. The gears, cogs, oil, chugging engines…everything. In Windows 8, this is still confusing, ugly, overcomplicated. In the Apple world, this is simpler, easier, uncomplicated. This is where Windows will fail. If I start to use an app that hasn’t been designed for the new “touch-friendly” shell (which is essentially all Windows 8 looks to be), then it fires up in its old, byzantine, bloated-hydra form. With iOS and the future of MacOS, this isn’t even an option. If an app hasn’t been designed to be used full-screen, it doesn’t matter, it’s still usable in its beautiful, native form.

This brings me around to the initial question of “Why are computers becoming simpler?”

The computer-savvy elite that used to be the only folks for whom computers were intelligible are no longer the only ones who can use computers, and computers are becoming simpler because that’s what we all want. Even programmers, developers, and coders want everyone to use computers. Everyone! They want their software to shine on beautiful hardware, too, and we’re seeing this happen from the world’s most innovative companies. Microsoft, however, doesn’t seem to get it. They want their software to be archaic, opaque, and impenetrable when it comes to interacting with the user.

Maybe that’s why they keep losing.

and another thing…

just about everything that i’ve read about the lack of iPhone/iPod/iPad multitasking goes something like this:

“…which means you can’t run pandora while…”

are you serious?  this is the argument against the iPad?  everything else, it does.  what else do you need to do?  seriously.  what else are you doing?  are you encoding video?  ripping a cd?  batch-editing photos?  this is a focused machine, and SURPRISE! it will play music in the background, just like the iPhone.  you can get emails pushed, chat notifications pop up right there, right in front of you, and texts come through just fine.  meeting appointments have a little alarm, i can get stock alerts from apps pushed to me if i want.

and you’re complaining about pandora?  please.

i just don’t think that’s a valid argument.